Communion wafers must have some wheat to be valid
Aside

Communion Hosts for Celiacs: Yes or No?

Communion wafers must have some wheat to be valid

This Easter Sunday I will not be taking the communion wafer. Yes, not even the low-gluten host. It’s not a decision I make lightly.

According to the Catholic church, the wafer must contain some wheat to be valid (“bread of life”) and a low-gluten host is acceptable for celebrating the Eucharist because it has some wheat. A non-gluten wafer is not valid. For more information, go to the Catholic Celiac Society.*

For several years I did take the low-gluten host and I didn’t notice any reaction. I figured the wafer contained such a minuscule amount of gluten that I could get by.

I was wrong.

Some of us with celiac disease, like my son, suffer recognizable symptoms after eating a crumb of gluten. Other people like me have so many other food allergies we often aren’t sure what food caused what reaction, or they don’t have noticeable reactions. But even if we don’t react with a stomach ache or a rash or lethargy, that tiny bit of gluten can wreak havoc on our bodies and lead to longterm healthcare issues.

Having a little bit of gluten every Sunday is like an alcoholic having a sip of vodka every Sunday.

Watch this video from Dr. Tom O’Bryan, a celiac disease expert.

I know many Catholics with celiac disease who will celebrate the Eucharist with a low-gluten host this Sunday, but I won’t be one of them. Will you?

*In 2003, the Vatican did say Catholics with celiac disease can celebrate the Eucharist by wine only, so Catholics have that option.

Breaking Up with Dr. Oz

Breaking Up with Dr. Oz

Dear Dr. Oz,

After thousands of afternoon dates, it’s time for us to go our separate ways.

You have lost my respect.

Like Dorothy who discovers the wizard is a fake, I have discovered you, Dr. Oz, are not the wizard of medicine you claim to be.

YOU CALLED A GLUTEN-FREE DIET A SCAM ON NATIONAL TV!  Millions and millions of people heard you! Including a few of my family members who think my celiac disease is all in my head. Thanks, Dr. Oz.

The audience even started cheering as if to say, “I knew all those gluten naysayers were idiots! Give me a slice of pizza now!”  Yes, you tried to cover up your error by saying “there are a lot of folks who have big time problem with gluten so I don’t have a problem with people who don’t like eating gluten foods…”

Don’t LIKE eating gluten foods! Huh?  I would LOVE to eat gluten foods–it’s my body that won’t let me!  Coincidentally I got “glutened” at a restaurant last night. Imagine a brick making its way through your digestive system. Today, I tried to run some errands, but I was so lethargic I was afraid to drive. It will be at least a week until I feel normal again.

This, Dr. Oz, is what living with CELIAC DISEASE is like. It is not a scam. Is is not BS. And when people hear a doctor call a gluten-free diet a scam, you hurt people like me and my son and the one in 133 of us with celiac disease. Not to mention the thousands and thousands of others with non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

That is why I am breaking up with you, Dr. Oz.

Don’t even think of sending me flowers.

Breaking Up with Dr. Oz” originally appeared at Adventures of An Allergic Foodie.

Hate When I Poison My Kids

Recently I gave my two sons food that made them sick. I mailed the youngest in college cereal that was not gluten-free and served my oldest dairy.

I poisoned them!

Gluten is Poison for SomeAfter five years of gluten- and dairy-free cooking and shopping, you’d think I’d have this celiac/allergy thing down by now. But nope, I still make mistakes.

Now my “kids” are young men and can fend for themselves. They are certainly capable of reading labels. However, I’ve been their mother much longer than they’ve been coping with celiac disease and a dairy allergy and they trust me. If I mail them a college care package, they’ll believe the food is safe. If I put the plate on the table, they won’t question whether they can eat it.

Well, they used to trust me.

Until I poisoned them.

A while back Costco carried 24-oz packages of Udi’s Natural Artisan Granola and the packaging said “soy free, wheat free, dairy free.”  I assumed it was the same Udi’s gluten-free granola I always ate. But I should have noted “wheat free” versus “gluten free.”  I didn’t. That is until just this week when I was eating it myself and I realized the oats weren’t certified gluten-free oats. Well, that explains the weeks College Boy was doubled over in pain. Oh a mother’s guilt.

Then there was the memorable Thanksgiving meal. We ordered a turkey, sides and gravy from a trusted source. I ensured–over and over again–that the food didn’t contain gluten. I forgot to ask if the gravy had dairy.  Poor kid worked the night shift and spent Thanksgiving evening in the bathroom. The gravy was made with heavy cream!

And these lentils  . . .  how did I miss the red wording: Contains Dairy.

Dairy in ingredients

If you’re a parent, you understand parental guilt. It’s okay if I eat the wrong thing, but it’s never okay for me to feed my kids gluten/dairy-containing food.

Luckily, my boys have forgiven me, though I’ve noticed them checking ingredient lists more.

That’s probably a good thing.

__________________________

If  you like this post, you may also like:

Celiac Disease Wasn’t a Part of the College Plan

I’m a Picky Eater and Proud of It!

Hate When I Poison My Kids first appeared at Adventures of an Allergic Foodie.