The Allergic Foodie Rap

The Allergic Food Rap

 

See those  girls at the bar banning gluten to look fit?

They’ve got no clue how rye and wheat make a celiac sick.

They sip their Skinny Girl martinis and Omission beer,

Feeling like Gwyneth Paltrow when it was cool to be her.

Even Dr. Oz can’t decide if gluten-free is good or bad,

But smart chefs sure know how to profit on a fad.

Every corner restaurant got wheat-free spaghetti,

Even the waiters say no bread’s made them skinny.

“Well good for you,” An Allergic Foodie wanna say,

“I haven’t lost a pound since eating this way.”

Neither can the girl eat dairy, corn and soy–all make her sick.

Ah, yes dude, take out your pen and pad–this isn’t a trick.

This girl’s diet has nothing to do with the media craze,

For most, this gluten-free thing is just another phase.

But after the gluten-free menus are long gone,

A.F.’s need for A.F. food will still be goin’ strong.

So treat her right–don’t give that girl food without checking

That nothing she eats will be a reaction in the making.

Your tip will reflect the attention you’ve given,

To make sure that girl leaves your restaurant livin’.

But see those girls at the bar skippin’ the crackers?

They don’t get how for celiacs gluten-free matters.

At the end a meal, celiacs will pass on the cake.

But NOT  the girls at the bar cuz their GF diets are fake.

(C) Amy E. Tracy

The Allergic Foodie Rap originally appeared on Adventures of an Allergic Foodie.

Cookies from Goldilocks Goodies

An Allergic Foodie Finds a “Just Right” Cookie

It’s not often an allergic foodie gets to eat a treat. Not often at all.

If I’m eating out, a restaurant may offer me sorbet–please no mango or pineapple or I’ll break out in hives–or a bowl of berries. A dessert cup of berries costs more than a pint at the store, so I usually smile sweetly and say, “I’m too full for dessert.”

I am never too full for dessert.

So imagine my happiness when these allergy-friendly cookies arrived on my doorstep!

A Sweet Treat for an Allergic Foodie

They arrived two weeks before my birthday, so I decided to save them for a birthday treat.

This was hard. Really, really hard.

But here’s the thing. Not only do I have celiac disease and allergies to dairy, soy, and corn, I also cannot eat vanilla, nutmeg and guar gum. Oh and yeast seems to be a problem lately. (Actually, yeast has been a problem for a long time, but I have a tiny bit of a problem with denial.)  All these allergens are common in gluten-free and “allergy-friendly” processed baked goods.

For an allergic foodie, the words “No Top 8” does not mean the cookies are “Allergy Friendly.”

Goldilocks Goodies Peanut Butter and Chocolate Chip cookies have FIVE ingredients. FIVE!  I didn’t have to scan the package for words like “maltodextrin” or “food starch.”  (Do note, however, if you have a peanut allergy, these aren’t for you.)

So I thought, how can a cookie stay together and taste good with just five ingredients?

I ate one. Okay I ate them all–it was my birthday. OMG, these are so gooooood.  I’m a Vermont girl, so I love the maple syrup flavor. The Himalayan sea salt gives the cookies a grown-up taste. Of course, I don’t know any kids who wouldn’t like them, too.

Lately, my husband has been into eating chocolate bars with almonds and sea salt while I drool, so I am really thrilled to now have something I can moan over and not give him a bite (we have issues; see my last post).

Besides having awesome cookies and other baked goods like Whoopie Pies, Goldilocks Goodies is a really cool small company. Emily Robins, the chief baker and founder, comes from a long line of bakers including her grandmother who singlehandedly rolled out nine pie crusts during harvest season to bake pies for the farm hands. Wow.

A Sweet Treat

Founder and Chief Chef of Goldilocks Goodies Emily Robins (right) with her mother

Emily went gluten free six years ago to help with the symptoms associated with Lyme Disease (celiac disease also runs in the family).  While going gluten free helped her feel better, she couldn’t find a cookie that wasn’t “grainy, too processed, and full of artificial ingredients.”  Like Goldilocks, Emily searched and searched for a cookie that was “just right.” Emily and I have a lot in common.

Discouraged, Emily began baking her own gluten-free cookies. She says, “My passion for baking was started because of my love of eating.”  Did I mention Emily and I have a lot in common?

As an allergic foodie, I believe it’s important for those of us with food restrictions to support the small companies like this one who are dedicated to making food we can eat safely. Without them, there’d be no cookies for an allergic foodie, and that would be sad. Really, really sad.

You can read all about Goldilocks Goodies here. The business is in Lancaster County,  PA but baked goods–did I mention they have WHOOPIE PIES?–can also be found in Virginia, Maryland and the DC area.  Some baked goods can be ordered online, too.

An Allergic Foodie Finds a “Just Right” Cookie originally appeared at Adventures of an Allergic Foodie.

Chocolate! Allergy Friendly! FREE!

If that headline got your attention, you’re probably a chocoholic like I am.

Did you also say this mantra when being tested for food allergies? Please don’t let me be allergic to chocolate. Please don’t let me be allergic to chocolate. Please don’t let me be allergic to chocolate.

Ha! You ARE a chocoholic like me!

Fortunately, to my great relief, I am NOT allergic to chocolate!

Unfortunately, I AM allergic to dairy, eggs, soy, gluten, corn and vanilla–all ingredients that are typically found in most chocolate.

For a long time, I was sad. Very, very sad. Especially during Valentines Day and my birthday. And maybe also Thanksgiving and Easter . . . and all the days in between.

But now I’ve recently discovered Amanda’s Own Confections. Actually they discovered me (thank you! thank you!), and it just so happens the month of April is both my celiac college son’s and my birthday month. Yes, I know the lemon in the sunglasses looks way too young to have a kid in college (or perhaps that’s why An Allergic Foodie uses a lemon for a Gravatar! LOL!).

Chocolate Bar Giveaway. Enter to win by Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 5 PM EST

Chocolate Bar Giveaway.
Enter to win by Tuesday, April 22, 2014, 5 PM EST

Anyway, back to chocolate. To celebrate our birthdays,  Amanda’s Own Confections wants to give one lucky person a present–a box of chocolate bars! That’s right! An entire box. TWELVE BARS OF GLORIOUS CHOCOLATE.

These chocolate bars make me close my eyes and moan–maybe that’s too much info?–and there are only three ingredients: Cane sugar, unsweetened chocolate, cocoa butter. So this makes them free of dairy, nuts, gluten, eggs, sesame, and fish/shellfish. (Why any fish would be in any chocolate is incomprehensible, but I’m told it happens.)

Here’s what you need to do to enter (you only have to do one, but if you do all I will do a happy dance and post it on You Tube*).

  • Write a comment below telling me how much you love chocolate (and my blog, of course).
  • Follow @anallergicfoodie on Instagram and like one of the pictures of Amanda’s chocolate bars. I’ll be posting several.
  • Follow me on Twitter–that 2,000 rule is killing me!–and tweet this blog post  with hashtag #amandasown
  • Like my Facebook Page and give a thumb’s up to one of my posts mentioning Amanda’s Own Confections.
  • Pin this blog post on Pinterest.

The contest will end on Tuesday, April 22, 8 PM EST. Must live in the U.S. to enter.

Ready. Set. Go!

I hope you win!

*I won’t really do a happy dance on You Tube because my sons, and maybe my husband, would be mortified.

Chocolate! Allergy Friendly! Free! first appeared at Adventures of An Allergic Foodie.

Doesn't always pay to be polite when you have food allergies

The Evolution of An Allergic Foodie

Lady in food counter overhears An Allergic Foodie regurgitate her litany of allergies and says: I would just die if I couldn’t eat cheese!

An Allergic Foodie smiles politely because her mother taught her if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything.

Waitress at upscale restaurant: How do you not eat bread and butter?  (She may have really been thinking, You look like you eat a lot of bread and butter.)

An Allergic Foodie smiles politely because her mother taught her if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything.

Cafeteria server during son’s college tour: Lady, you sure are picky.

An Allergic Foodie smiles politely so as not to embarrass teenage son and because she taught him if you don’t have anything nice to say, don’t say anything.

Waitress at Japanese Restaurant: You can eat the tofu (I’d just told her I was allergic to soy).

An Allergic Foodie smiles, stands up, loudly tells the waitress that tofu is soy, tells the manager he needs to train his staff, then stomps out of the restaurant because her mother never had to cope with food allergies or celiac disease.

If you don’t have anything nice to say, LEAVE THE RESTAURANT.

The Evolution of An Allergic Foodie first appeared at Adventures of An Allergic Foodie.

The Masters and Pimento Cheese Sandwiches

I went to the Tuesday practice round of the Masters Golf Tournament in Augusta, GA this week.  It was exciting to see a few of the players I’ve been watching on TV for years as well as the notable and beautiful golf course.

And I’d read and heard so much about the food.

You had to know this would be about the food and not the golf, right?

Concessions at The Masters

Augusta National is famous for its $1.50 egg salad sandwiches and pimento cheese sandwiches served at the tournament. (I wonder if they charge so little so you won’t feel so bad about forking over $100 for a golf shirt later on?).  Having celiac disease and being allergic to dairy, I knew I wouldn’t get to eat either of these sandwiches and I bought along my own gluten-free ham sandwich.

Here’s the thing that surprised me though: The only healthful and non-wheat food choices were bananas and fruit cups (and I couldn’t even eat the fruit cups because they contained pineapple!).  The one food I could eat was a trusty bag of Cape Cod potato chips with this impressive packaging.

The only food an allergic foodie could eat at The Masters

For Eaters of Everything, there were mini moon pies, cookie sandwiches with Georgia peach ice cream in the center, caramel popcorn, and lots and lots of candy.

Hard to eat at The Masters if you have celiac disease and/or food allergies

Yup, it was all junk food. (I’d use another word but my  husband is afraid we’ll be banned from future tournaments if I do.)

Doesn’t it seem odd that an athletic event only served junk? Even baseball and football stadiums are offering gluten-free hotdogs and buns and salads these days.

DSC00173

I’m guessing at Augusta National, it’s all about tradition. People expect the pimento cheese sandwich and the mini moon pies. I get it.

But at an event that requires miles of walking and hours of standing, most of the spectators could probably use a little protein pick-me-up instead of a sugar rush.

Here’s the other thing that surprised me: I didn’t feel like I was missing out–even when my husband said the egg salad was really good. The old me would have been sad and maybe a little angry that she didn’t get to taste it. The new me really could care less.

Somewhere along the way, a switch has flipped.

I’m okay with “missing out,” especially when I know the food will make me sick. Really, really sick.

This doesn’t mean I wouldn’t have liked something besides a bag of chips.

After being a men-only golf club for 80 years, Augusta National invited two women to join, so maybe, just maybe, adding a salad with grilled chicken to the concessions isn’t too far off.

The Masters and Pimento Cheese Sandwiches first appeared at Adventures of an Allergic Foodie.

 

Hate When I Poison My Kids

Recently I gave my two sons food that made them sick. I mailed the youngest in college cereal that was not gluten-free and served my oldest dairy.

I poisoned them!

Gluten is Poison for SomeAfter five years of gluten- and dairy-free cooking and shopping, you’d think I’d have this celiac/allergy thing down by now. But nope, I still make mistakes.

Now my “kids” are young men and can fend for themselves. They are certainly capable of reading labels. However, I’ve been their mother much longer than they’ve been coping with celiac disease and a dairy allergy and they trust me. If I mail them a college care package, they’ll believe the food is safe. If I put the plate on the table, they won’t question whether they can eat it.

Well, they used to trust me.

Until I poisoned them.

A while back Costco carried 24-oz packages of Udi’s Natural Artisan Granola and the packaging said “soy free, wheat free, dairy free.”  I assumed it was the same Udi’s gluten-free granola I always ate. But I should have noted “wheat free” versus “gluten free.”  I didn’t. That is until just this week when I was eating it myself and I realized the oats weren’t certified gluten-free oats. Well, that explains the weeks College Boy was doubled over in pain. Oh a mother’s guilt.

Then there was the memorable Thanksgiving meal. We ordered a turkey, sides and gravy from a trusted source. I ensured–over and over again–that the food didn’t contain gluten. I forgot to ask if the gravy had dairy.  Poor kid worked the night shift and spent Thanksgiving evening in the bathroom. The gravy was made with heavy cream!

And these lentils  . . .  how did I miss the red wording: Contains Dairy.

Dairy in ingredients

If you’re a parent, you understand parental guilt. It’s okay if I eat the wrong thing, but it’s never okay for me to feed my kids gluten/dairy-containing food.

Luckily, my boys have forgiven me, though I’ve noticed them checking ingredient lists more.

That’s probably a good thing.

__________________________

If  you like this post, you may also like:

Celiac Disease Wasn’t a Part of the College Plan

I’m a Picky Eater and Proud of It!

Hate When I Poison My Kids first appeared at Adventures of an Allergic Foodie.

People Who Don’t Have Eating Issues Should Butt Out

On New Year’s Eve, Ox Restaurant, an Argentina steakhouse in Portland, posted an Instagram photo of myriad sticky notes with dietary restrictions. Eater published the photo under the headline This Is Just a Nightmare of Restaurant Customer Allergies.  

Photo from  Ox Restaurant in Portland on Instagram, 12/31/2013

Photo from Ox Restaurant in Portland on Instagram, 12/31/2013

I was all ready to read yet another negative review of customers with food allergies, but that wasn’t the case. What Ox owners Greg and Gabrielle Quiñónez Denton wrote on their Instagram post, and Eater reported, was that the special orders were “nothin’ special.”

Nothin’ special!

Keep in mind, this was a ridiculously busy night–New Year’s Eve! And the restaurant was offering a prix-free menu. Personally, with my myriad allergies and celiac disease, I would never ever expect a restaurant to “redo” a prix-free menu for me on one of the busiest nights of the year. In fact, I called five restaurants weeks before New Year’s Eve to find one that was offering a full menu and then I asked if they could accommodate me.

I’m nice that way. Evidently not everyone in Portland with food issues feels the same way I do. Again I say, Bravo Ox!

Here’s the part that’s gonna make you mad  . . . the comments that followed Eater’s brief article.

Oh where should I start?  Maybe with this one . . .

Comment #1: The percentage of gluten allergies here is about 20%, the reality is about 1.5% in the country. So most of them must be a choice. Next time choose to stay home.

Not sure where this guy got his numbers, but I’ll go to the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness for mine: “One out of every 133 Americans has celiac disease. That’s equivalent to nearly 1% of the U.S. population. However, 95% of people with celiac disease remain undiagnosed or misdiagnosed. This means that up to three million Americans have celiac disease and only about 200,000 know they have the condition.”

Wow. No matter how many times I hear those statistics I’m still astounded, and I’m always left thinking how many people are suffering and not knowing why.  Maybe they’ve figured out they should eliminate gluten from their diet before a doctor told them to.  They made a choice not to eat gluten. Therefore, according to the guy above, they should not dine out.

For so many of us eating gluten is not a choice but a medical necessity. I would like to think many restaurants are glad I choose to spend my hard-earned cash at their establishments.

Comment #2: They should go to the hospital not a restaurant. People that haven’t worked in a restaurant should not eat in one.

I worked at Friendly’s in high school so I guess I’m qualified to eat in a restaurant. What a weird way to think. I haven’t worked in a clothing store, so I guess I shouldn’t shop in one. I haven’t worked in a grocery store, so I guess I shouldn’t buy groceries. I’m just going to stop here.

Comment #3: What’s the most annoying is that most of these are preferences, not allergies.

Huh? More than 170 foods are known to cause allergic reactions. People can be allergic to odd foods like lemon and pepper and lentils; I know people who are allergic to all of these. I happen to be allergic to asparagus and capers and nutmeg. I usually don’t list all my allergies when I order at a restaurant (we’d never get to eat!), but I do request no asparagus because it’s such a common side. I’m sure waitstaff think I just don’t like asparagus, but the reality is asparagus makes me really, really sick.

Comment #4: [They’re] just begging to have their food spit on. The entitlement mentality of modern US diners is just out of control. Stay at home if you have so many stupid allergies, no one really cares.

This person is just heartless and mean. Obviously he/she has never met someone who has gone into anaphylaxis, or had a child double up in pain because he ingested wheat. According to the Centers for Disease Control, there has been a 50% increase in food allergies since the 1990s. If everyone stays home, how will restaurants survive?

Comment #5: I waited tables in the early nineties with a tyrant of a chef; he would not do special orders and if we asked, he would go berserk. I totally understand the side of the customer saying, we’re paying we should get what we want. But then there is the side of the restaurant, one special order per server upsets the whole flow of the kitchen. People take their demands too far these days.

Did you hear that people? You are taking your  food allergies and celiac disease demands too far!  You are upsetting the flow of the kitchen. How dare you!

Final comment from an allergic foodie: People who don’t have eating issues should butt out.

People Who Don’t Have Eating Issues Should Butt Out” originally appeared at Adventures of an Allergic Foodie.