Live Courageously with Food Allergies: Online Summit Nov. 3-6

Avoid eating those foods.

That’s the only direction the doctor gave me when I was diagnosed with multiple food allergies and celiac disease as an adult. Little did I know then that eliminating dairy, gluten, soy, corn, and many more foods from my diet would be as challenging as climbing Pikes Peak with a backpack full of rocks.

The first thing I did after leaving the doctor’s office was go grocery shopping. Big mistake. Reading the back of packages, looking for processed foods that didn’t contain dairy, soy, or gluten, tears streaked my face. Even the organic health foods in the special freezer section contained soy! What was I going to eat? How would I feed my family?

Then came my first meal out. By the time I eliminated all my allergens, I was left with steamed broccoli and applesauce.  I’ll never forget my first plane trip after diagnosis when I didn’t pack any safe food.  All I could find to eat in the airport was a bag of potato chips.

Food Allergy Wellness Summit

I was alone with my food restrictions and stressed and maybe even a bit depressed. In my circle of family and friends, I was the only one with “food issues.” I felt like an outsider at social events and family gatherings and became somewhat reclusive. These weren’t my best years.

That’s why I’m so excited about the Food Allergy Wellness Summit, Nov. 3-6, that Crystal Sabalaske of Cluttershrink started. A busy mom with a house full of food allergies, Crystal dreamed up this Summit as a way to help families like hers. The Summit is online and free, so you can listen to the topics that interest you at your convenience.

You’ll learn how to:

  • travel and navigate social situations while staying healthy
  •  save money while buying gluten-free and allergen-friendly foods
  • send your kids to school and college with the know-how to keep them safe
  • apply updated medical expertise to help you manage your food allergies
  • reduce food allergy-related stress in family, friendship, and romantic relationships
  • enhance your well-being through nutrition
  • cook and bake sans allergens
  • organize your kitchen into a giant “safe zone”

An Allergic Foodie will share tips for the college celiac on Nov. 6, 2014 during Food Allergy Wellness Summit

I’m humbled to be speaking about college life with food restrictions with such a prestigious group of food-allergy experts, including:

This Summit is the guidance I wish I’d have after hearing the doctor say, “Avoid eating those foods.”

Sign up TODAY.

An Allergic Foodie will share tips for the college celiac on Nov. 6, 2014 during Food Allergy Wellness Summit

FOOD ALLERGY WELLNESS SUMMIT: COLLEGE 101

My husband and I drove through Nashville this past weekend and stopped to have dinner with the college boy. You’ve heard me refer to our son often as the  “College Celiac.” Yes, he inherited his mom’s celiac genes, something we discovered after he left home and went far, far away. Actually, he believes the amount of wheat he ate during freshmen year–pizza, pasta, bagels, cookies–triggered his celiac. He’s probably right.

Over gluten-free appetizers, I asked my son if he ever cheated and ate a slice of pizza or a cookie. Okay, I was really wondering if he ever slipped up and had a beer at a party. Perhaps it was the dozen of red solo cups and the beer pong table in his rented house that made me wonder this.

“I’m never even tempted,” he said. “It’s not worth feeling stupid all week.”

Food Allergy Wellness Summit: College 101

My son’s worst celiac symptom is brainfog. Feeling lethargic and air-headed can obviously make learning and studying hard. Trying to adapt to college life is challenging enough without having to worry about eating the wrong foods and getting ill.

And oh how I hated those terrible middle-of-the-night phone calls when he was doubled over in pain. I wondered if it was truly a gluten reaction or if he had appendicitis or food poisoning. Should he go to the ER, or wait it out?

When  he ate in the school cafeterias, he got glutened often. We tried moving him to a suite with a kitchen and that proved to be even worse–the other boys left half-eaten pizza and breadcrumbs everywhere! Moving to a house last year helped, but he still keeps a toaster in his room and gluten-free foods under his bed.

We’ve both learned a lot in the last four years. So when I was asked to speak about our experience for the FOOD ALLERGY WELLNESS SUMMIT–a FREE ONLINE 4-day event with 12 food allergy experts–I jumped at the chance to help other parents and students about to embark on the college journey. There seems to be a wealth of information out there for younger kids with food allergies and celiac disease, but not so much for the high school and college student.

Surviving College with Food Allergies or Celiac

If you have a child with food allergies, or you are a high school student preparing for college, please join me on November 4 for “I Can’t Eat That: Living with Food Restrictions in College.” I’ll offer lots of advice on everything from choosing the right school to preparing to leave home to eating and socializing on campus.

After listening to my talk, you’ll  receive TWO FREE DOWNLOADS specific for college students from the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness and Food Allergy Research & Education. Plus you’ll have a chance to WIN THREE GREAT PRIZES  perfect for the college student: a $25 gift certificate to Well Amy; an assortment of treats free of the top ten allergens from Surf Sweets; and an autographed copy of The Everything Gluten-Free College Cookbook by Carrie S. Forbes.

An Allergic Foodie will share tips for the college celiac on Nov. 6, 2014 during Food Allergy Wellness Summit

SIGN UP FOR THE FOOD ALLERGY WELLNESS SUMMIT TODAY!

Food Allergy Wellness Summit: College 101 originally appeared at Adventures of an Allergic Foodie