Spring Cleaning: How to Make Your Home Allergy Friendly

A distinct mildew odor assaulted me as I entered the small rental house. Looking up, I noticed water spots on some of the rooms’ ceilings.  Mold dotted the kitchen counters and bathroom sinks.  I imagined the wall-to-wall carpeting hadn’t been vacuumed since renters moved out months ago.

My chest tightened and my throat itched. I started to cough and sneeze.  This house was a breeding ground for allergens. I quickly left.

I’ve been allergic to mold and dust mites since childhood and my oldest son inherited my allergies and asthma, so I’ve always  followed doctors’ orders for keeping an allergen-friendly home. Experiencing a reaction to this rental house reminded me of what would happen if I didn’t–and that maybe I should do a little spring cleaning.

The following infographic from AllergyCosmos offers many simple tips for eliminating allergy and asthma triggers from your home. I’m forwarding it to my son who is now living on his own. I hope you find it useful. Be sure to let me know what you do to keep your family safe from allergens.

How to Make Your Home More Allergy FriendlySource: http://www.allergycosmos.co.uk/how-to-make-your-home-more-allergy-friendly

Spring Cleaning; How to Make Your Home Allergy Safe originally  appeared at Adventures of an Allergic Foodie.

Will This Cell Phone Hurt My Family’s Health?

They are putting a cell tower in front of my house.

towerWhile researching how I could fight it, I came across this article about environmental conditions that impact our health.  I thought you’d find it as interesting–and alarming–as I did.

 

Truth11

Why Do Smells Make Some People Sick?  Jan. 22, 2012 — Science Daily

Do you get a headache from the perfume of the lady next to you at the table? Do cleaning solutions at work make your nose itch? If you have symptoms prompted by everyday smells, it does not necessarily mean you are allergic but rather that you suffer from chemical intolerance. According to Linus Andersson at Umeå University, this hypersensitivity can be the result of an inability to get used to smells.


Normally your smell perceptions diminish rapidly, as when you enter a friend’s apartment. Even though you clearly notice smells just inside the door, you don’t think about them for long. For people with chemical intolerance, on the other hand, smells seem always to be present. Psychology researcher Linus Andersson has exposed both intolerant and non-intolerant individuals to smells and compared their reactions.

“The hypersensitive individuals felt that…

View original post 4,063 more words